19 Sep 14 at 8 am

Brussels//August 2014

Brussels//August 2014
 46279
18 Sep 14 at 10 pm

strangelykatie:

Princess Mononoke print!

(via momorsa)

strangelykatie:

Princess Mononoke print!
 10882
18 Sep 14 at 9 pm

arpeggia:

Violinist Jascha Heifetz playing in Mili’s darkened studio as light attached to his bow traces the bow movement, 1952

Photo by Gjon Mili - LIFE archive

More related posts: LIFE | Gjon Mili | Jascha Heifetz

(via is--bjorn)

 3082
18 Sep 14 at 9 pm

nevver:

Death Valley days, Jordan Sullivan

(Source: jordan-sullivan.com, via is--bjorn)

 20872
18 Sep 14 at 9 pm

cultmovie:

During a convention interview, star Glenn Howerton was asked why his character was named Dennis, whereas Charlie Day and Rob McElhenney's characters are named after themselves. Howerton responded by saying that he wanted to distance himself from his character as much as fucking possible.

(via folkpvnk)

cultmovie:

During a convention interview, star Glenn Howerton was asked why his character was named Dennis, whereas Charlie Day and Rob McElhenney's characters are named after themselves. Howerton responded by saying that he wanted to distance himself from his character as much as fucking possible.
 1202
18 Sep 14 at 9 pm

(Source: amy-box, via oh-totoro)

 508
18 Sep 14 at 2 pm

ughneville:

You see, there are still faint glimmers of civilization left in this barbaric slaughterhouse that was once known as humanity. Indeed that’s what we provide in our own modest, humble, insignificant… oh, fuck it.

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)

(via daddyfuckedme)

 307
18 Sep 14 at 1 pm

sadfag:

Devon Aoki shot by Daniel Sannwald for Pop Magazine, F/W14

(via daddyfuckedme)

sadfag:

Devon Aoki shot by Daniel Sannwald for Pop Magazine, F/W14
 5
18 Sep 14 at 11 am

Liege is a beautiful city full of stunning architecture, and we had one hell of a gig there. Moshpits on a boat always rock.

Liege is a beautiful city full of stunning architecture, and we had one hell of a gig there. Moshpits on a boat always rock.
 16
18 Sep 14 at 10 am

railpass:

Going to Yosemite Instead

"You know, there’s room for one more in the car if you want to come to Yosemite."

That’s all I needed to hear, of course. Instead of getting on a train back to Chicago the next morning, I’d be with friends in a loaded up rental car heading for the Sierras. Though we arrived late in the park, the following morning it was clear none of us had any intention of easing our way into our very short stay. For me, it’s just more of the same at this point. Hard life, right?

After getting the worst possible news that Yosemite Falls was completely dried up due to California’s severe drought, we quickly changed plans to hike Vernal and then Nevada Falls. Now, while I’d like to say this was a new, authentic experience, truth be told I have been to Yosemite before. From what my parents have told me, I was a baby and spent a lot of the car ride puking. Apparently my family did a lot of traveling when I was too young to remember anything, but at least they have stories to tell me about how I pooped here or vomited there. That, and I’m finally starting to understand why I have this deep-rooted desire to travel. Clearly, it’s to spite my folks for taking me to all these places when I was too young to actually remember a damn second of it.

Psychological issues thinly veiled in facetiousness aside, after just our first hike in the heaven that is Yosemite I now realize I would go to this park again even if I’ve been there a hundred times. For those inexperienced with hiking, the Vernal/Nevada Falls hike on the Mist Trail and *heart flutters* John Muir Trail may be pretty difficult, but it’s incredibly accessible with frequent water/restroom facilities. I was shocked by that part, and wondered if the park had truly been lost to development. If you’ve been on this blog any stretch of time, you know I prefer my time in nature to be as difficult and dangerous as possible, but seeing as this part of my journey wasn’t just about me, it’s a small concession to be able to refill water bottles instead of simply rationing what you got. Also, in writing this post I was pretty relieved to read that Vernal/Nevada Falls have like some of the most accessible trails in the park. Luckily, wilderness remains.

Another tradition I’ve come to have in my traveling is swimming in any body of water that’s near where I’m going, assuming the risk of me getting a disease is moderately low. At Vernal Falls, the water there was pure, chilly, snow melt. The shock of jumping in usually forces all the air out of your lungs, and if you stay in water that cold you’re sure to get hypothermia. So, naturally I stripped to my underwear and jumped in, swimming to either ends of the pool and attempting to climb up the slick rocks of the waterfall until I could feel all the heat leaving my body. People do weird things in nature. It’s a great mid-point refresher on the way up to Nevada Falls, especially in that late-summer heat. Going further up, though, and with just a little bit of off-trail hiking, we found an amazing swimming hole surrounded by huge boulders, secluding it from the trail and other hikers- minus some dude who was apparently on acid, which combined with hiking off trail seems like an incredibly bad idea. People do weird things in nature.

Though the hike up from Vernal to Nevada is steep and tough, the water up there (the same water of the Merced River which flows down into Vernal Falls) is somehow warm. It’s exactly the right temperature to sit in and forget about time, the sun’s eventual setting, and that you’re at the summit of the trail loop and the most amazing view is literally just around the corner. We would eventually put our clothes back on to further show off an impressive sock game, soak in the valley views, and stare at the unforgiving beauty of Liberty Peak and Half Dome, then saunter our way back down the John Muir Trail, but only after a little more time in the water.